Posts Tagged Zwingli

A Baptist Argument from History

     It has become the custom amongst modern Baptist apologists to argue from history in order to establish a Baptist apostolic succession of believers’ immersion from the earliest Christian times similar to that boasted of by the Landmarkers and now even the Southern Baptists. There is indeed sporadic evidence of such a succession but only within Baptist churches who have, mostly since the Reformation, covenanted to practice such a succession where it previously did not exist.      Many Baptists look to the Swiss Widertœuffer, or Täufer movement of the 16th century as historical examples of those who practised so-called believers’ baptism only, but here they err greatly. No less than twelve or so different Swiss Täufer… Full Article

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Henry Bullinger and the Covenant of Grace

Bullinger’s lasting contribution to the Reformation      Covenant Theology is widely accepted today as an essential ingredient of Reformed doctrine. The earliest, most developed, comprehensive and meticulously perfected exposition of this doctrine was presented to the public during the middle 1520s by Heinrich Bullinger (1504-1575) of Zürich. His exposition of the Covenant remains the classical and most widely accepted view of God’s Testament for His people. Indeed, this teaching is most likely the greatest and lasting contribution Bullinger ever made to the Reformed churches so that he can truly be called the Father of Reformed Covenant teaching. He above all our Reformers pointed out to an all-embracing degree how the same… Full Article

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Hooker and the Counter-Reformation Part One

The Real Teaching of Richard Hooker      Dr Roger Beckwith opened his essay entitled ‘The Real Teaching of Richard Hooker’ by saying:      Hooker was a second-generation Reformer. He did not have the task of distinguishing Anglican theology from that of Roman Catholics or Anabaptists. This had been done by the first-generation Reformers Cranmer and his colleagues, and their conclusions had been embodied in the Anglican formularies, especially the Thirty-nine Articles, from the teaching of which Hooker never strayed. Hooker’s task was the more sensitive one of defending Anglican theology against other Protestants, who wanted to alter it. His great book ‘The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity’ is this defence. He uses some new… Full Article

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Francis Lambert and the Pan-European Reformation

Francis Lambert and the Pan-European Reformation        The Reformation in Europe around 1510-1530 was built on that of the preceding two centuries. In England Grosseteste, Bradwardine, Wycliffe and the Lollards had done great reforming work as also the Hussites, the Bohemian Brethren and the Waldensians on the Continent. There never was a century without Reformation somewhere in Europe and her influence on other countries. Such early reforms were prior to the denominational counter-Reformation which broke up the inter-Protestant and pan-European international revivals of true religion in those times. The break-up resulted in much Reformed knowledge being lost and inter-church renewal was forgotten where denominations replaced… Full Article

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Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany

Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part One: Melanchthon’s Climb to Fame Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany Part Three: Melanchthon’s Failure as a Reformer ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany Rifts that did not break friendship      Now Rome sent one agent after another, including Frederick Nausea, Cardinal Campeggio’s personal secretary to win Melanchthon for themselves. He told all these emissaries of Rome that if they had the Church’s welfare at heart, they would join him in purifying it from faulty doctrines and traditions. He told Nausea that he erred if he thought Luther wanted to abolish church practices. The fight is not about external things… Full Article

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Covenant Theology as Seen by New Covenant Theology: Part Two

     Part One dealt with the alleged agreements between the two covenant concepts, though neither the NCT’s own views of God’s Covenant with His Son, nor their erroneous presentation of Covenant Theology represent Biblical teaching. NCT’s dualistic view of the Testaments also affects their alleged disagreements with Covenant Theology as outlined in Theopaedia. NCT alleged disagreements with Covenant Theology 1. The Church started at Pentecost, and there is therefore no “Church” as such in the Old Testament/Covenant.      One cannot separate the Church from the everlasting Covenant of Grace. This was preached and believed by the prophets in the Old Testament and also preached and believed by New Testament saints such as… Full Article

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Henry Bullinger (1504-1575): Vater und Hirte der Reformation

Teil I. Von Bremgarten nach Zürich (1504-1531) 1. Henry Bullingers Bedeutung für die Reformation      Seit den fünfziger Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts haben sich Reformierten Christen erneut für das Zeitalter der Puritaner interessiert. Die Holländer nennen dies Die Nadere Reformatie oder andauernde Reformation. Diese an sich notwendige Entwicklung kam aber zu einer Zeit, als die Reformation selbst nahezu vergessen war. Wir haben also das Blattwerk des Baumes der Reformation untersucht, ohne zu merken, auf welchem Baumstamm und welchen Wurzeln es wuchs.      Seit dem Neunzehnten Jahrhundert ist relativ wenig Forschung in den Quellen der Reformation unternommen worden. Wir wissen immer noch wenig über unsere… Full Article

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Heinrich Bullinger (1504-75) and the Catabaptists

Heinrich Bullinger (1504-75) and the Catabaptists: An examination of Alleged Roots of Present Day Baptists A brief look at the meaning of ‘Catabaptist’.      Most Baptists nowadays look upon the Swiss Catabaptists or Anabaptists of the 1520s as being the forerunners of the British Baptists who are, in turn, seen as the founders of the American Baptist churches. This argument is far from compelling as the following study of Heinrich Bullinger’s discussions with the Swiss Catabaptists will show.      The term Catabaptist is thought to have been coined by Gregory of Nazianzus in the fourth century to tease those Christians who insisted on a sacramental understanding of the amount of water necessary for baptism by… Full Article

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Henry Bullinger (1504-1575)

Shepherd of the Churches Bullinger’s importance for the English Reformation      Perhaps no Reformer has been so neglected in modern times as Henry Bullinger, though he produced far more sound Christian writings than Luther, Calvin and Zwingli combined. An average of four editions of his works per year were printed in Switzerland alone for a hundred years and over fifty printers in other European countries were turning out countless editions. Reformers such as Miles Coverdale translated Bullinger into English from the 1530s on. Bullinger’s books were internationally treasured because they were said to be free of Calvin’s obscurity and Musculus’ scholastical subtlety and packed much sound, perspicuous doctrine into… Full Article

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