Posts Tagged Reformed

Hooker and the Counter-Reformation Part One

The Real Teaching of Richard Hooker      Dr Roger Beckwith opened his essay entitled ‘The Real Teaching of Richard Hooker’ by saying:      Hooker was a second-generation Reformer. He did not have the task of distinguishing Anglican theology from that of Roman Catholics or Anabaptists. This had been done by the first-generation Reformers Cranmer and his colleagues, and their conclusions had been embodied in the Anglican formularies, especially the Thirty-nine Articles, from the teaching of which Hooker never strayed. Hooker’s task was the more sensitive one of defending Anglican theology against other Protestants, who wanted to alter it. His great book ‘The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity’ is this defence. He uses some new… Full Article

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Reformation: Europe’s House Divided By Diarmaid MacCulloch

Reformation: Europe’s House Divided By Diarmaid MacCulloch Penguin Books, 2004      Penguin adorns the covers of their new 832 paged paper-back on the Reformation by Diarmaid MacCulloch with 22 eulogistic blurbs announcing it as wonderful, sardonic, monumental, dazzling, breathtaking, magisterial, eloquent, a triumph, astonishing, masterly, blockbusting, superb, a milestone, a masterpiece of learning, and ‘in its field it is the best book ever written’. Who could resist buying such a book to be on top of Reformation research? It has gained the Wolfson Prize for History, for apparently providing everything “from politics to witchcraft, from liturgy to sex”. It has won the British Academy Book Award because ‘Its… Full Article

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The Seventeenth Century: No Time of Reformation

True heroes exchanged for lesser men     Nowadays, at least in Britain, our Reformed churches teach us to take our gaze off the 16th century Reformation and concentrate on the Revolutionary period of the 17th century where, they say, we shall find true Reformation theology. This, they say, was the age of Puritanism, though they define Puritanism in a very limited and often political way. This is advice which would be foolish to follow. The 17th century brought with it a grave departure from the teaching of the Reformation. The British public, government and churches experienced military and moral rebellion, down-grading and back-sliding in religion, fierce intolerance, anarchy in politics, an upsurge of Rationalism, a bawdy… Full Article

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Where Olyott Got It Wrong

     Stuart Olyott caused such a stir with his slangy persiflage of Luther in his Where Luther Got It Wrong – and Why We Need to Know About It that the BOT magazine had to spend part of the following two issues striving to repair the damage. Olyott claims, without giving either source or context, that Luther’s position on the Word of God was the following:      ‘I opposed indulgences and all papists, but never by force. I simply taught, preached, wrote God’s Word: otherwise I did nothing. And then, while I slept, or drank Wittenberg beer with my Philip of Amsdorf, the Word so greatly weakened the papacy that never a prince or emperor did such damage to it. I did nothing: the Word did it all. Had I wanted to start… Full Article

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Reformation Day Declaration not Reformed

Sir:      Strictures against those who disagree with the Reformation Day Declaration outlined in Issue 7650 lose their force because the doctrine of forensic, declarative justification outlined therein is not that of our Reformers. It reflects the Humanism taught by Philip Melanchthon, often called Germany’s Erasmus. Unlike the bulk of Reformers including Bucer, Bullinger, Calvin and the English compilers of the 39 Articles and Homilies, the Melanchthon school taught a mere passive, non-causative, forensic justification turned into actual justification through obedience to natural law and the gospel. Because it was humanistic, it was man-centred. Sadly, the corrupt view of Reformation doctrine promoted in the declaration has… Full Article

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Are We Reformed?

Dear Brethren,      From time to time, we read postings to the HBS which state dogmatically that Baptists are, or ought to be, neither Reformed or Protestant. Such subscribers see so much error in these two branches of the institutionalised establishments that they beg loudly to differ and proclaim a ‘better way’. Not all Baptists, however, agree and we have that school represented by members of the American Founders’ Journal and the British Reformation Today who affirm strongly that Baptists are, or ought to be, both Reformed and Protestant. Again, as in most matters of faith and practice, Baptists are divided amongst themselves which led to Kenneth Good’s most interesting book, ‘Are Baptists Reformed?’      Now,… Full Article

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