Posts Tagged Mr Wilson

Contra Knox

Sir,      It was refreshing and challenging to read Mr Wilson’s doughty Scot’s support of Knox though he has given both his countryman and myself the wrong-sized shoes. Furthermore, as Andrew Lang in his definitive work on Knox also says of his subject, Mr Wilson sails dangerously close to the wind in his historical analysis. Yet he calls me controversial! In such discussions, we must take into sympathetic account each other’s background. I argue from the very Puritan and Non-Conformist point of view which Knox opposed. So one could hardly expect me to view Knox as my ideal Reformer. Mr Wilson argues from Knox’s merits in ousting Franco-Popish tyranny from Scotland. I do not challenge these merits in the least, however… Full Article

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Mountain Movers’ Review

Letter to the Editor Dear Sir,      It was encouraging to read the positive reviews of my book The Mountain Movers in the English Churchman. Mr. Wilson’s kind remarks were particularly impressive, though he disagrees with some of my conclusions. Nevertheless, I was surprised to find myself censured, in a magazine with Evangelical Anglican traditions on the subject of Evangelical Anglicans, for believing that certain Presbyterian views of church order are not above criticism. When I portrayed my non-Anglican mentors, I was also careful to defend them against unwarranted criticism from other churches, including the Church of England. In these matters we must remain balanced. Mr Wilson’s exaggerated statement, “The idea, too,… Full Article

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Anglicans and Presbyterians

Dear Sir,      Despite Mr. Wilson firm recommendation, my books do not contain the subject matter he associates with them. However, it is fashionable to denigrate the Tudors and Stuarts and, as Hanko and Gay, and pronounce Anglican Reformers guilty by association. This argument would weigh equally on the Continentals who were patronised by the like-questionable Prince Maurice. Dutch Presbyterianism was the seat of Arminianism and it cannot be doubted that in 1619 the English Reformation was in better shape.      The Dutch told Carleton re Episcopacy: “they did much honour and reverence the good order and discipline of the church of England; and, with all their hearts, would be glad to have it established among them; but… Full Article

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