Posts Tagged John Durie

The Covenant: Part Two What it is

The Covenant: Part Two What it is A Recapitulation      In Part One we compared the ‘Testament’ and the ‘Covenant’ in the Bible. I felt it was necessary to point out the nature of the two clauses in Christ’s Legacy for us before going on to talk about God’s Covenant with His Son. All theories of covenants based on Dispensational grounds are wrong because they teach a discontinuous and not an eternal covenant in Christ. Again, the Covenant is not discontinuous, it is not divided, and it is not Dispensational. As Christ is the Author and Finisher and Keeper of the Covenant and is the same yesterday, today and for ever, His Covenant is permanent and everlasting. It stretches through all eternity, and thus cannot be… Full Article

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Lessons in Humanity from the Life and Work of Jan Amos Comenius

Lessons in Humanity from the Life and Work of Jan Amos Comenius: A Study in Anthropological Pansophy Jan Hábl A Review Article   Preface: The Father of Modern Education by Thomas Johnson     Johnson, who appears to be Hábl’s mentor, writes on p. 9 of principles in nature and in human nature that we can recognize and that we should follow in order to reach our earthly and spiritual destinies. He thus wishes to separate the best parts of human nature from those in human nature which stand in conflict to them.     This is an artificial dissecting of the human in man which has often been used for totalitarian purposes in order to promote a less-than human society. True Pansophy is not limited to the anthropological and… Full Article

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Preface by Prof. Dr. Wolf-Friedrich Schäufele

The Practical Divinity of Universal Learning: John Durie’s Educational Pansophism   By George M. Ella Preface      What awaits the reader of a book on John Durie’s pansophism? “Pansophism” – that sounds like an esoteric secret science, like special occult teachings, like “Theosophy” and “Anthroposophy”. In fact, the opposite is true. Not an exclusive secret knowledge for the few, but free access to the entire knowledge of mankind for all, regardless of race, social class, age and gender, is what a correctly understood pansophism aspires. It does not look for an exclusive knowledge of God, man or the cosmos, but rather for an integration and connection of all knowledge and its free distribution. Pansophism is not… Full Article

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Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Four

Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Two Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Three Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Four Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Four Post-enthronement problems      After Cromwell’s enthronement, his time was much taken up by the wars with Roman Catholic Spain, but his elevation, as Queen Christina of Sweden foretold, began to earn respect for him abroad. Thurloe’s State Papers include a letter from the English ambassador in Spain now informing Cromwell that Spain was eager for a treatise between the ‘King of… Full Article

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Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Three

Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Two Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Three Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Four Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658): Rebel, Republican and Reformer Part Three The New Babel Confusion.      Before Charles was placed in his coffin at Whitehall, it became clear that a number of the judges, now faced with punishment, had refused to sign the death warrant and others had been compelled to sign by force. Cromwell is said to have examined the head of the King at Whitehall to make sure it was totally severed and he was really dead, before saying, ‘If… Full Article

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1662: The Great Ejection By Gary Brady

     Gary Brady’s book of 165 pages purports to give the background of 2,000 ministers who rebelled against the Church of England’s and the King’s authority in 1662 and suffered under a Parliament that had no respect either for the one nor the other. Anti-Dissenting laws formerly enforced against the Church of England by the Commission of Ejectors under Cromwell’s Commonwealth Councils were now applied to a minority who rejected the restored Church. In order to understand the fate of all these 17 century Dissenters from different parties, it is necessary to trace the persecutions back to their roots during Mary’s bloody reign and throughout the reigns of Elizabeth, James, Charles I, Cromwell and Charles II.      Brady… Full Article

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The Book of Common Prayer -its value and benefits

Lecture III: The Watershed: the Restoration of Uniformity My task and my sources      My task is to present an overview of the 17th century lead-up to the Act of Uniformity of 1662. My primary sources besides the Prayer Book are the Calendar of State Papers; the Common’s Journals: the Thurloe Papers; Gardiner’s Constitutional Documents, Cardwell’s History of Prayer Book Conferences, the Hartlib Papers; Byfield’s Assembly Minutes; Walker’s and Shaw’s records; Evelyn’s and Pepys diaries: Burnet’s, Durie’s, Laud’s, Prynne’s and Fuller’s eye-witness accounts and the Bodleian Library’s Special Collections. My secondary research includes Hooker, Strype, Benton, Huntington, Butler, Parker, Blunt, Tatham,… Full Article

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Blurbs for my new book: The Practical Divinity of Universal Learning: John Durie’s Educational Pansophism

The Practical Divinity of Universal Learning: John Durie’s Educational Pansophism   By George M. Ella   O.St.R. (Land NRW); I. Staatsprüfung Sek. I und II (Duisburg); II. Staatsprüfung Sek. I und II (Essen); Översiktskurs in Theologie (Uppsala); fil. kand. (Uppsala); BD (London); PGCE (Hull); Dr. phil. (Duisburg); Dr. theol. (Marburg).   ‘I highly recommend Dr. George Ella’s insightful work The Practical Divinity of Universal Learning. Dr. Ella sheds new light on the pioneering work of John Durie (1596-1680) in early attempts at universal education and Protestant church unity. Dr. Ella convincingly proves that Durie’s contributions to Europe’s educational and political reforms in the late 17th and early 18th… Full Article

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The Other George Melvyn Ella

The Puritanboard      Most of my readers will be familiar with the on-line web-site The Puritanboard. The site often carries good, general articles of instruction and edification. At times, however, the contributors seem to be very strict and particular in their ecclesiastical views and their narrow understanding of church and denominational history. I have striven from time to time to visit their site, to offer praise and encouragement for certain positions they represent and to suggest solutions to some of their ingrained problems caused mostly through lack of background knowledge. However, I found entrance into their discussions technically extremely difficult, so I gave up trying. A couple of years ago, I had another go and… Full Article

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John Durie’s Practical Divinity

A Brief Introduction to Durie’s Life      Born 1596 in Scotland, John Durie was a descendent of noblemen, diplomats, ministers and rebels. When John was a child, James VI forced the family into exile. After extensive school and university studies in France and Holland, John tutored the son of a Huguenot merchant in France. A multi-linguist, he passed as a native citizen of Britain, France, Germany and Holland using variations of his name in each country. In Germany, he was always ‘Johannes Duraeus’.      From 1625-30, Durie served as a diplomat and preached to the merchants and soldiers in Elbing, Prussia, which became Gustav Adolf’s administrative seat in 1626. He started writing on education in 1628…. Full Article

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