Posts Tagged John Calvin

Irresistible Grace

A lecture given at the Protestant Reformation Society, August 27th, 2009, Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, England      Irresistible grace represents the traditional ‘I’ in the acronym ‘TULIP’. So now I shall tease you a little. The name ‘Tulip’ comes from the same Turkish root as ‘turban’ and the flower of that name was introduced by the Turks to Europe as a symbol of the spreading Ottoman Empire, or the TULIP ERA as the Islamising of Europe was called. The popular strains Tulipa turkestanica and Tulipa kurdica point to this. Why the Turkestan turban-shaped talismanic Tulip and Turkoman black merchants robes were chosen as Christian symbols of faith and ministry by post-Reformation parties, must be the subject of… Full Article

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Henry Bullinger

Henry Bullinger was a pioneer Reformer who, like his contemporary Martin Bucer, has long remained in the shadows cast by Martin Luther and John Calvin. Happily, modern scholarship is revealing both Bucer and Bullinger to have been top rank Reformers in no way secondary to Luther and Calvin. Indeed, modern research shows that Bullinger was a more thorough and consistent Reformer than both Luther and Calvin. Born in 1504 in Bremgarten, Switzerland to a wealthy priest and his common-law wife who later joined the Reformation movement, Bullinger was already treading Reformed paths by 1521 and within the next seven years had produced 86 works on Reformed doctrine which would be entitled ‘Calvinist’ today, though they preceded Calvin’s… Full Article

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Review of Amyraut Affirmed

Review of Amyraut Affirmed: or ‘Owenism, a Caricature of Calvinism’ by Alan C. Clifford      In this provocative booklet, Dr Allan C. Clifford’s responds to Ian Hamilton’s Amyraldianism – is it modified Calvinism? by presenting Amyraldianism as orthodox Calvinism and the Westminster Confession as a caricature of it. Clifford’s argument is that both John Calvin (1509-1564) and Moses Amyraut (1596-1664) believed that God had two conflicting wills in salvation. Clifford is so enamoured with his theory that he dispenses with objective textual proof. He merely quotes speculations he has made in former works “for the benefit of those who have been either unable or unwilling to consult” them, arguing that this is all that… Full Article

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Contra Knox

Sir,      It was refreshing and challenging to read Mr Wilson’s doughty Scot’s support of Knox though he has given both his countryman and myself the wrong-sized shoes. Furthermore, as Andrew Lang in his definitive work on Knox also says of his subject, Mr Wilson sails dangerously close to the wind in his historical analysis. Yet he calls me controversial! In such discussions, we must take into sympathetic account each other’s background. I argue from the very Puritan and Non-Conformist point of view which Knox opposed. So one could hardly expect me to view Knox as my ideal Reformer. Mr Wilson argues from Knox’s merits in ousting Franco-Popish tyranny from Scotland. I do not challenge these merits in the least, however… Full Article

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Hyper-Calvinism and the Call of the Gospel

David Engelsma, Reformed Free Publishing Association      Prof. Engelsma’s book which reveals the follies of what he terms preaching the ‘well-meant offer’ has been around for a number of years, providing much food for thought. This book has now been revised and reprinted. As the subject has become a common topic of debate amongst Reformed Christians, readers may value the comments of one long familiar with the book before purchasing it themselves, a purchase I urgently advise them to make.      Not that I can wholeheartedly recommend the entire work. The book has great strengths and most obvious weaknesses. Its main strength is that it examines the motives of those who claim that all who do not indiscriminately ‘offer’… Full Article

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John Gill and the Charge of Hyper-Calvinism

     One of the most successful Baptist contenders for the truth in the 18th century was John Gill  (1697-1771) , a London pastor who was second to none in the kingdom for scholarly learning and prowess as a preacher. Sadly Gill has faded from the reading of most evangelicals, owing to the fact that his successors held to a radically different view of the gospel. Now he is being rediscovered as the number of publications dealing with him over the last few years show . Something, however, is going seriously wrong. Though contemporary American works such as Thomas J. Nettle’s By His Grace and for His Glory and Timothy George’s essay on Gill in Baptist Theologians show clearly that Gill was no Hyper-Calvinist but a great Reformed 18th… Full Article

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