Posts Tagged Hyper-Calvinism

Puritan Papers

Puritan Papers Volume I, 1956-59: A Review Article A Conference downgraded      Puritan Papers brought back memories of my early years in England as a new born Christian and the help which I received from the teaching of the Puritan Conference up to 1964 and my continued interest during my later sojourn in Sweden and Germany. When the Puritan Conference ended in 1970, my interest waned. The Westminster Conference became more narrow in spiritual scope but broader in political and denominational tub-thumping. It radically redefined Puritanism. The shutting out of Jim Packer, one of my first mentors in Christ, was a tragic move on the part of John Knox-like Martyn Lloyd Jones. It bordered on an excommunication and forced Jim to find… Full Article

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The Life and Thought of John Gill

The Life and Thought of John Gill (1697-1771): A Tercentennial Appreciation Ed. Michael A. G. Haykin Brill Anxious thoughts repelled      I turned to The Life and Thought of John Gill edited by Michael Haykin with apprehension because of former highly negative comments on the subjects by several contributors to this Festschrift. I read the book, however, with increasing delight as it became obvious that the winds of change are blowing away the myths that have encompassed Gill in recent years.      In his introduction Dr. Haykin reviews the research done on Gill up to the present and rightly argues that there is little deep, sound work on Gill’s theology available. The book under his editorship book seeks to make good the… Full Article

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Why I am not a Follower of Andrew Fuller

     Great changes are occurring in the contemporary theological scene and there seems to be a mass exodus from the old paths of our fathers in the faith to the new-fangled paths of what is now known as ‘Evangelical Calvinism’. The inspired teachings of the New Testament, the Reformation and the preaching of such 18th century stalwarts as John Gill, James Hervey and Augustus Toplady are being given up for the teachings of a comparatively nobody who is being re-created as a star, given VIP treatment and promoted as the new Luther, the trumpet blast, the sounder of the alarm, the one who fanned the smoking wick of the evangelical Awakening into a blaze and the prophet of the new evangelism. This person is none other than Andrew Fuller… Full Article

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An Unworthy Gospel (Fullerism)

     The 18th century is often called the Century of Reason. This is because Newtonian scientists and philosophers such as Locke taught that the workings of the known world and the ways of the unknown God could all be demonstrated by logical deduction. Men of letters such as Beattie and Blair in Scotland and Lessing in Germany taught that following the paths of logic was akin to following in the footsteps of God. Lessing even went so far as to say that Christ had the right use of reason in mind when He promised that the Holy Spirit would come. In his Education of the Human Race, Lessing pointed out that by the aid of reason, man would go on to perfection and finally reach a state of being Christ-like. Many Christians accepted this… Full Article

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New Focus Interview on Hyper-Calvinism

Antinomian Hyper-Calvinism versus the Law and the Gospel: A New Focus Interview with George M. Ella Q. The 18th century controversy regarding Hyper-Calvinism and Antinomianism seems to have emerged again in recent years and, although your book William Huntington: Pastor of Providence has been welcomed by many, a few voices maintain that you have opened old wounds and should have let sleeping dogs lie. A. Wounds caused by cries of Hyper-Calvinism have long been open and much salt has been rubbed in them in recent years. The once sleeping dogs of Antinomianism have been barking loudly for all to hear for some time. My aim in reviving Huntington’s teaching on the full Law and the full Gospel, as also my publications on Cowper, Gill and… Full Article

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Reformation Today and Justification from Eternity

      The March/April, 1999 number of Reformation Today features four articles on John Gill. The first, entitled John Gill – a Sketch of his Life, is a succinctly written biography of Gill’s faithful and productive life in the service of the gospel. Next, Editor Errol Hulse continues with John Gill – An Appreciation, presented as a review of The Life and Thought of John Gill (1697-1771), (ed. Michael Haykin).  Here, Hulse ignores the facts of Gill’s own testimony to make what he calls ‘a fair assessment of the damage which emanated from his errors.’ Thus, though the book Hulse reviews chiefly depicts Gill as a great evangelist and soul-winner, Hulse’s one-sided critique is centred on Gill’s supposed Hyper-Calvinism and… Full Article

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Duty Faith and the Protestant Reformed Churches

Dear Brother J.,       Thank you so much for your detailed analysis of my attempt to illustrate saving faith as opposed to duty-faith. You brought many coals to Newcastle for me and your Athens-bound ships were full of wise old owls, all of which were welcome. It is good to find that though you may disagrees with me on terms, we have so very much agreement on contents, though we are only at the beginning of a debate. It is very obvious that you Presbyterians use many words that I do, yet with different meanings. Thomas Scott used to say that all denominations tend to inject their own particular meaning into words and thus distinguish themselves from others. This is a true observation but it makes it difficult for outsiders to… Full Article

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John Gill and the Charge of Hyper-Calvinism

     One of the most successful Baptist contenders for the truth in the 18th century was John Gill  (1697-1771) , a London pastor who was second to none in the kingdom for scholarly learning and prowess as a preacher. Sadly Gill has faded from the reading of most evangelicals, owing to the fact that his successors held to a radically different view of the gospel. Now he is being rediscovered as the number of publications dealing with him over the last few years show . Something, however, is going seriously wrong. Though contemporary American works such as Thomas J. Nettle’s By His Grace and for His Glory and Timothy George’s essay on Gill in Baptist Theologians show clearly that Gill was no Hyper-Calvinist but a great Reformed 18th… Full Article

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The Banner of Truth Trust and Antitrinitarianism

     It is said that the first person to use the term Antitrinitarianism was Henry Bullinger who coined the word in his Responsioministorium Tigurinae ecclesiae ad argumenta Antitrinitariorum Italopolonorum (A Response of the ministers of the Zürich Church to the Arguments of the Italopolish Antitrinitaarians) of 1563. Around 1560 a group of Italians in Geneva quarreled with Calvin and fled to Zürich where they asked Bullinger to mediate. Bullinger urged them to return to Geneva and make their peace with Calvin. The Italians claimed that this would be pointless as Calvin had wrongly accused them of heresy and would have no fellowship with them and had threatened them with the death penalty. Calvin indeed… Full Article

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Christian Bennett’s Review

Dr George M. Ella Eupener Weg 1 45481 Mülheim Germany st0008@aixrs1.hrz.uni-essen.de 7th June, 1998 The Editor Evangelical Times Grange Close Faverdale North Industrial Estate Darlington Co Durham, DL3. OPH England Dear Brethren,      Would you kindly publish this letter which is a response to Christopher Bennett’s supposed review of my book. It must have been a very rushed affair as the reviewer obviously had not time to read the book. This seems typical of today’s would-be writers. I recently tracked down the Christian author of one review of my book on Fuller who also gave a lecture on the book in which he admitted, amidst jokes at my expense, that he had never read it. No remorse was shown, only a display of… Full Article

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