Posts Tagged Church of England

Hooker and the Counter Reformation: Part Three

Modern Anglicanism and Dissent no criteria for judging the immediate Post-Reformation period      In the following essays, I will continue to look at the radical views of the proto-Presbyterians in general and Cartwright’s and Travers’ view of church discipline in particular, especially regarding the episcopacy, and compare them with those of Jewel and Hooker and other English Reformers who were true to the official Confessions of the Church of England at that time. Sadly, most of those critics who use Cartwright and certain contemporaries nowadays to bring the Church of England in Reformed times into disrepute cite what he allegedly said during his day and compare that with the sad state of the Church of England today. This is an… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hooker and the Counter-Reformation Part One

The Real Teaching of Richard Hooker      Dr Roger Beckwith opened his essay entitled ‘The Real Teaching of Richard Hooker’ by saying:      Hooker was a second-generation Reformer. He did not have the task of distinguishing Anglican theology from that of Roman Catholics or Anabaptists. This had been done by the first-generation Reformers Cranmer and his colleagues, and their conclusions had been embodied in the Anglican formularies, especially the Thirty-nine Articles, from the teaching of which Hooker never strayed. Hooker’s task was the more sensitive one of defending Anglican theology against other Protestants, who wanted to alter it. His great book ‘The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity’ is this defence. He uses some new… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Harmful Church Patronages

A letter to the Evangelical Times concerning their criticism of the Church of England for abolishing patrons: Dear Sir,      At long last the Anglican Church is doing away with her evil practice of having patrons lord it over churches of which they themselves are often not even members. The ET should rejoice but the ET looks upon this positive move as ´ominous` (Ominous changes in the Church of England, Jan. issue). How can this be?      Patronages, whether enforced by rich individuals, endowments or non-church-based organisations, are the curse of the C of E, often ensuring that churches receive ministers whom they do not want. A well-known example is the fate of John Newton of Olney Hymns fame. Newton was burdened with two… Full Article

Tags: , , ,

1662: The Great Ejection By Gary Brady

     Gary Brady’s book of 165 pages purports to give the background of 2,000 ministers who rebelled against the Church of England’s and the King’s authority in 1662 and suffered under a Parliament that had no respect either for the one nor the other. Anti-Dissenting laws formerly enforced against the Church of England by the Commission of Ejectors under Cromwell’s Commonwealth Councils were now applied to a minority who rejected the restored Church. In order to understand the fate of all these 17 century Dissenters from different parties, it is necessary to trace the persecutions back to their roots during Mary’s bloody reign and throughout the reigns of Elizabeth, James, Charles I, Cromwell and Charles II.      Brady… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Book of Common Prayer -its value and benefits

Lecture III: The Watershed: the Restoration of Uniformity My task and my sources      My task is to present an overview of the 17th century lead-up to the Act of Uniformity of 1662. My primary sources besides the Prayer Book are the Calendar of State Papers; the Common’s Journals: the Thurloe Papers; Gardiner’s Constitutional Documents, Cardwell’s History of Prayer Book Conferences, the Hartlib Papers; Byfield’s Assembly Minutes; Walker’s and Shaw’s records; Evelyn’s and Pepys diaries: Burnet’s, Durie’s, Laud’s, Prynne’s and Fuller’s eye-witness accounts and the Bodleian Library’s Special Collections. My secondary research includes Hooker, Strype, Benton, Huntington, Butler, Parker, Blunt, Tatham,… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Reply to a Critic of the Church of England Reformation Concerning my Biopgraphy of Toplady

An uninformed know-all seeks to suppress the truth concerning Augustus Toplady.        This letter was written to an enemy of the Church of England Reformers who wished to censor and suppress the publication of my Augustus Toplady biography. He maintained that my work was that of a Roman Catholic and an enemy and that I had defended ‘malignants’ and ‘drunkards’. Mention is made of two books in the letter but the biography and anthology were eventually printed together in one large volume. The criticisms of my correspondent were based on secondary and tertiary literature without my critic being aware of the original documents needed in forming an opinion. Sadly, most of theological discussion nowadays has become a rabies… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Troubles at Frankfurt

Lecture given at the Protestant Reformation Society, Regent’s Park College, Oxford, 2007 The Troubles at Frankfurt A Vindication of our Martyrs’ Legacy   The tiny enclave that rescued the Reformation in England      Readers of Asterix will be familiar with a tiny fortress, a mere dot on the map of the Roman Empire, which was to bring Rome to its knees. So much for fairy-tales. Solid fact are better than airy fiction. The real Frankfurt of 1553-59 was also a tiny bastion on the Roman Catholic map which because of its hospitality to the bulk of the Marian refugees, succeeded, by God’s grace, in providing the doctrinal and spiritual power which brought down a more dangerous Rome in Reformation England. Sadly… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Donatists and Their Relation to Church and State

The new search for historical roots      Nowadays, Christians are becoming increasingly interested in the history of their churches and in the search for giants of the faith in the past who might be used as models for their future. Perhaps never before has this longing to know more about the past so motivated the churches. Of course, there are great spiritual treasures to be found in church history and much to be learnt through past triumphs and failures. However, there is also a danger in this preoccupation with the past against which we must be warned. As our churches grow sadly less and less dependent on Scripture, we tend to look for historical roots for our support. So many once Bible-believing churches who scorned tradition… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Letter On Our Reformers’ View of the Word

     Letter to the Evangelical Times claiming that later Puritans and Dissenters were sounder than our Reformers in their understanding of Scripture – The letter was not published. Sir:      Towards the end of the nineteen fifties, several Christian magazines served their readership well by re-introducing the teachings of the long-neglected Puritans. Subsequently, the Puritans have become the staple reading of Reformed men. Sadly, however, this has led to a great neglect of our first generation Reformers whose works were used as a basis for Puritan teaching. Reformers such as Jewel, Lever, Latimer, Coverdale, Cox, Grindal, Bullinger, Bucer and Peter Martyr, pillars of the Church of England, were most strong on doctrine,… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Review of Iain Murray’s ‘John Wesley and the Men Who Followed Him’

Like John Harding in his candid review of Iain Murray’s new book on Wesley, I was alarmed at the author’s exodus from Reformed doctrines. Could he not praise Wesley objectively for the good he did without having to side with him in his errors? Murray has lost his balance. Formerly he was pro Whitefield and contra Wesley, now he is pro Wesley and Whitefield is forgotten. Forgotten, too, are the adverse teachings of Wesley on the doctrines of grace, his extraordinary superstitions such as his belief in ghosts and his shocking treatment of sound men such as Hervey, Toplady, Erskine, Cennick, Cudworth and the Hill brothers. Murray tells us that it is not his task to enquire into these things. Thus we are only permitted to see Wesley at his… Full Article

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,