Posts Tagged Baptism

A Baptist Argument from History

     It has become the custom amongst modern Baptist apologists to argue from history in order to establish a Baptist apostolic succession of believers’ immersion from the earliest Christian times similar to that boasted of by the Landmarkers and now even the Southern Baptists. There is indeed sporadic evidence of such a succession but only within Baptist churches who have, mostly since the Reformation, covenanted to practice such a succession where it previously did not exist.      Many Baptists look to the Swiss Widertœuffer, or Täufer movement of the 16th century as historical examples of those who practised so-called believers’ baptism only, but here they err greatly. No less than twelve or so different Swiss Täufer… Full Article

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The Language of Baptism

Dear visitors to this site:      There is much healthy thinking going on today concerning the meaning of baptism in Scripture and its function as a visual gospel aid in bringing souls to Christ and preparing them to receive repentance, forgiveness and the remission of sins and the blessedness of a life in the Spirit. I have been working some time on the teaching of John Bunyan and his friend Henry Jessey and their reasons behind their warning their brethren not to make a god out of baptism. They also warned those who saw in baptism a passport into a denomination or even the Church. Both men fellowshipped and pastored churches in which different forms of baptism were performed in the name of the Trinity and did not bar any Christian… Full Article

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Richard Hooker and the Counter-Reformation: Part Two

A revolution in language and dress demanded      It was during Hooker’s days that a major innovation occurred in English Protestant theology regarding the ministry of the church. It was initially a mere linguistic thrust encouraged by new, democratic ideas. As such, it was relatively harmless but the movement quickly took over republican and oligarchic ideals which eventually meant the end of the English Church, the English way of life and the English form of government. Most of these would-be ‘reformers’ felt they were bringing more effective organizational methods from the Continent into Britain and even adopted Continental dress to stress their reforming fervor. Actually, their views were so insular that the Continent… Full Article

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Baptism in the Early Church

Prof. Hendrick F. Stander Prof. Johannes P. Louw Carey Publications      This Carey Publications reprint deals with baptism in the first four centuries, claiming that ‘the writings of this era are important since they reveal the origins and developments of Christian practices and dogmas.’ Such an examination is unhelpful in tracing origins and developments when isolated from the Biblical sources as in this work. Christian faith is not built on ‘practices and dogmas’ but on a personal relationship with Christ expressed in Christian doctrine. The work claims to adopt no ‘theological point of view’, yet dogmatises that baptism can only mean immersion; it is not for households but for single adults; there is no… Full Article

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Some thoughts on Carson’s, Conant’s, Gale’s, Philpot’s and the Paulicans’ contradictory views on Baptism

Receiving the antitype before the type      Most Baptists accuse believers in covenant baptism of confusing type with antitype. Actually, the boot is on the other foot in the special case of Carson who argues:      “Sins are washed away by faith in the blood of Christ, but they are symbolically washed away in baptism. Just as we become partakers in the death of Christ the moment we believe; in baptism, this participation is exhibited by a symbol.”      There are several problems of interpretation attached to this very Arminian statement. It is not our faith in Christ that washes away sin but the objective fact that Christ has washed away our sins independent of our prior faith and He has given us faith to accept… Full Article

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Heinrich Bullinger (1504-75) and the Catabaptists

Heinrich Bullinger (1504-75) and the Catabaptists: An examination of Alleged Roots of Present Day Baptists A brief look at the meaning of ‘Catabaptist’.      Most Baptists nowadays look upon the Swiss Catabaptists or Anabaptists of the 1520s as being the forerunners of the British Baptists who are, in turn, seen as the founders of the American Baptist churches. This argument is far from compelling as the following study of Heinrich Bullinger’s discussions with the Swiss Catabaptists will show.      The term Catabaptist is thought to have been coined by Gregory of Nazianzus in the fourth century to tease those Christians who insisted on a sacramental understanding of the amount of water necessary for baptism by… Full Article

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Prepositions and Voices

Dear Brethren, Please permit me to express: Some Thoughts on the Use of Prepositions and Voices Regarding Baptism A. Baptism with a view to      A factor which often leads to misunderstandings regarding the nature and purpose of baptism is that the preposition ‘eis’ which carries the basic meaning ‘with a view to’ is translated by four different English prepositions. Thus Romans 6:3 is rendered, “Know ye not, that so many of us were baptised INTO Jesus Christ were baptised into his death?” Matthew 3:11 is rendered, “I indeed baptise you with water UNTO repentance: but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptise you with the Holy Ghost and with fire.” Matthew 28:19… Full Article

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