Posts Tagged Antinomianism

Maurice Roberts and Hyper-Calvinism

Those ‘Theological Swearwords’ ‘Antinomianism and Hyper-Calvinism’ Again      Some years ago in the Evangelical Times, one of their directors, John Legg, referred to the terms ‘Antinomianism and Hyper-Calvinism’ as ‘theological swearwords’ and used them indiscriminately with his co-director Errol Hulse to describe my practice of preaching the whole of the gospel to the whole man wherever I was placed by God to do so. This irresistible calling led to my marching 35 kilometers a day through swampy marshland and glacier-covered territory with a map and compass to help me find the way and a fishing rod, snares and a small casting-net in order so I could feed myself so I could take the gospel to nomad Lapps and to my work… Full Article

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Dealing with Birds of False Feathers

Dear Friends,      The two letters copied below were written in response to charges of Antinomianism, Hyper-Calvinism and false analyses of Fullerism coming from the Founders Journal and their supporters. These accusations were never justified and made by people who did not know me from Adam and had not read my books. One particular person, now long departed from the Reformed faith he professed then to hold, was giving an after-dinner jocular speech in which I was mentioned disdainfully when he was asked by an unamused table-guest why he condemned me so violently and joked about me so unbrotherly yet did not appear to know what I taught. He received the answer that the speaker did not have to read me to denounce me. The brother who… Full Article

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Letter Defending William Huntington

Sir:      It is understandable that one who identified himself so closely with the English Reformers, Whitfield and the Marrow Men should be criticised by Arminians. For Huntington, Arminians were Antinomians who rejected the condemning and convicting use of the law in evangelism, inviting sinners to approach God “as if they had never apostatized”. They believed that man was not totally fallen but was naturally able to make saving decisions. Huntington preached a full gospel whereas his Fullerite and Wesleyan critics taught respectively that the doctrines of grace were for believers only or to be rejected as ‘the religion of the Turks’.      Contrary to adverse criticism that Huntington stood alone, he was supported by a… Full Article

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The Old Paths versus New Divinity

The Old Paths versus New Divinity: Exemplified by William Huntington and Andrew Fuller  Part I      The work of the Banner of Truth Trust proved a great encouragement in my spiritual development and I became an enthusiastic reader of their magazine from its start. Throughout the following years, especially during the seventies and eighties, I was able to break away from my work in Sweden and Germany to attend those inspiring Leicester Conferences which blessed the soul of so many pastors and teachers and gave them a love for Reformed doctrines and personal holiness. In those early halcyon days of theological unity and brotherly love, we young men believed that we were on the verge of a great revival and a return to the Old… Full Article

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History of the English Calvinistic Baptists 1771-1892: from John Gill to C. H. Spurgeon

History of the English Calvinistic Baptists 1771-1892: from John Gill to C. H. Spurgeon Robert W. Oliver, BOT. Emerging Deconstructionism      This book is based on Robert Oliver’s 1985 doctoral dissertation. His title is misleading. It is not a history of the British Calvinistic Baptists but, as Michael Haykin’s Foreword explains, an analysis of controversies regarding communion, the use of the law and the so-called fee offer. These are discussed at an inter-denominational level with chapter-long references to Non-Baptist William Huntington, set up as the arch-contender against Dr Oliver’s modernistic Emergence Theology. As Oliver hints in his Preface, the work is a justification of his own prodigality away from the… Full Article

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A Second Open Letter to the Founders’ Journal

A Second Open Letter to Thomas Ascol and Earnest C. Reisiger, Editors of The Foundation Journal. Dear Brethren,      I trust that my last letter was received safely in the spirit I sent it and that my heart reached your heart through my words, clumsy as they were. I am unused to this kind of correspondence and need to mould and manage my words so that they are honouring to God. Any help or advice you can give me to this end will be greatly appreciated and received as a token of your brotherly love to me.      The bulk of this letter was written a few days after my last but I waited until I received a copy of Iain’s book before finishing it. Up to now, I had only the chapter on Gill, published in the Banner magazine to… Full Article

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Antinomianism and the Righteousness of the Law

     Most readers are familiar with the Calvinist-Arminian controversy of the 18th century in which free-grace, championed by Whitefield, Toplady and Romaine was set against free-will, maintained by Fletcher, Sellon and Wesley. The controversy dealt with whether salvation was made possible by Christ, depending on man’s acceptance of it, or whether Christ secured His Church’s salvation by His atoning death. At the same time, a similar controversy was raging on a closely related topic.  “Is the Mosaic Law God’s eternal standard or has it become irrelevant to unbeliever and believer alike as a Covenant of Works and as a yardstick of sanctification?”      The leading contestants in the Calvinistic-Arminian controversy were mainly… Full Article

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Tobias Crisp (1600-1643): Exalter of Christ Alone

     Tobias Crisp served the Lord during a time of civil war and ecclesiastical unrest. There were threats of a papal take-over in the Established Church and Amyraldianism, Arminianism, Grotianism and Socinianism were flooding into the country to water down the faith inherited from the Reformers and defended by the Puritans. Crisp found these new religions false as they did not exalt Christ. Entering the ministry as an unconverted man      This ‘holy and judicious’ person, as Augustus Toplady describes Crisp, was born into a family of London sheriffs and aldermen and was educated at Eton, Cambridge and Oxford, finishing his studies by gaining a D.D.. He married Mary Wilson, an Alderman’s daughter, and the couple were… Full Article

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Why I am not a Follower of Andrew Fuller

     Great changes are occurring in the contemporary theological scene and there seems to be a mass exodus from the old paths of our fathers in the faith to the new-fangled paths of what is now known as ‘Evangelical Calvinism’. The inspired teachings of the New Testament, the Reformation and the preaching of such 18th century stalwarts as John Gill, James Hervey and Augustus Toplady are being given up for the teachings of a comparatively nobody who is being re-created as a star, given VIP treatment and promoted as the new Luther, the trumpet blast, the sounder of the alarm, the one who fanned the smoking wick of the evangelical Awakening into a blaze and the prophet of the new evangelism. This person is none other than Andrew Fuller… Full Article

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The Evangelical Liberalism of Andrew Fuller

     Andrew Fuller (1754-1815), a Particular Baptist who departed radically from the faith of his father’s is becoming quite a name amongst churches and para-church movements that once taught the doctrines of grace. Though at best a Calminian and at worst an absolute heretic, Fuller is being proclaimed by the evangelical Reformed Establishment as the Luther of the Baptists  and as the man that fanned the smoking wick of the Evangelical Awakening into a blaze.  He is seen as the reformer who rescued Calvinists from the dunghill of their fathers in the faith  and is now presented as the greatest theologian of the 19th century, a genius whose work was epoch-making.  No praise seems to be too high or too exaggerated for this sturdy… Full Article

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