Posts Tagged Anglican Church

Reply to a Critic of the Church of England Reformation Concerning my Biopgraphy of Toplady

An uninformed know-all seeks to suppress the truth concerning Augustus Toplady.        This letter was written to an enemy of the Church of England Reformers who wished to censor and suppress the publication of my Augustus Toplady biography. He maintained that my work was that of a Roman Catholic and an enemy and that I had defended ‘malignants’ and ‘drunkards’. Mention is made of two books in the letter but the biography and anthology were eventually printed together in one large volume. The criticisms of my correspondent were based on secondary and tertiary literature without my critic being aware of the original documents needed in forming an opinion. Sadly, most of theological discussion nowadays has become a rabies… Full Article

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Letter written to the Evangelical Times on Toplady

     Sir: Graham Hind’s June review sadly hides all I wrote in remembrance of that godly man, Augustus Toplady. Instead, he shows preference for John Wesley, disdain for the Gospel Magazine and disinterest in the great work of God done through the pre-Rebellion Reformed Church of England. Hind’s simplistic etymology is used as an excuse for his lack of attention to the subject matter.      Rather than refute Toplady by praising Wesley, one must ask oneself which Christian stood nearest to Biblical, Reformed doctrine. Glossing over Wesley’s dishonesty against Calvinistic evangelists is an unhelpful argument from silence.      Mr Hind’s prejudiced reading has missed my point concerning whether John, James or Julius… Full Article

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E C Justification from Eternity

Sir:      Kenneth Harris’ recommendation of Rutherford’s insistence on justification in time contradicts the Anglican Reformers who spoke of a three-fold manifestation of justification i.e. from eternity, in the conscience and at glorification. So, too, Presbyterian Reformers such as Witsius outlined justification in nine stages from eternity into time. Our Reformers accounted the elect just before God in union with Christ from eternity by having Christ’s righteousness first imputed to them and then made conscious in them through God-given faith. This Tyndale taught in Pathway to the Holy Scriptures and Prologue to Romans. The Anglican Homily on Justification stresses that “justification is the office of God alone, and is not… Full Article

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Queen’s Abdication

Sir;      Though sympathising with John Graham re the Queen’s abdication, I fail to see the need for Anglican Christians, freed of their governess, to leave their Church. Are not the very Christians to whom he refers the true Church of England? A church is not where one goes but what one is.      Should Mr. Graham empty the Anglican Church of Christians, where would he transfer them? They might be an asset to his own denomination, but this would be out of the frying-pan into the fire. The many factions regarding faith, worship and church order amongst Baptists do not lag behind Anglicans in anti-Scriptural liberalism, sacramentalism and Pelagianism. Recent studies (Baptist Quarterly 8/2000), show how historically,… Full Article

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Anglicans and Presbyterians

Dear Sir,      Despite Mr. Wilson firm recommendation, my books do not contain the subject matter he associates with them. However, it is fashionable to denigrate the Tudors and Stuarts and, as Hanko and Gay, and pronounce Anglican Reformers guilty by association. This argument would weigh equally on the Continentals who were patronised by the like-questionable Prince Maurice. Dutch Presbyterianism was the seat of Arminianism and it cannot be doubted that in 1619 the English Reformation was in better shape.      The Dutch told Carleton re Episcopacy: “they did much honour and reverence the good order and discipline of the church of England; and, with all their hearts, would be glad to have it established among them; but… Full Article

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The Synod of Dort

The Synod of Dort (1618-9): Milestone of the Reformation The background      The Dutch town of Dortrecht (Engl. Dort), may be unfamiliar to many an English-speaking Christian but it was the place where the churches of Holland, Britain, Germany and Switzerland held a great ecumenical conference which resulted in their unanimous agreement concerning the doctrines of grace reflected in the clear teaching of Scripture and the orthodox faith since New Testament times.      From the start, Britain played a major role in this conference due to several factors, the most well-known being the influence of James I on the Continent. James had studied the works of Vorstius, one of the Continent’s Arch-Arminians and was alarmed that… Full Article

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