Posts Tagged Amyraldianism

The Development of Opposition to the Reformed Church of England

Part One: How things began   The gospel of transforming grace versus the gospel of unchanging law               There is much confusion concerning the alleged ‘puritanism’ of the 16th century non-Roman Catholic opposition to the Reformed Church of England and the Puritan Movement of the post-1640s and much has been written in recent years which has totally redefined, modified and radicalised what Puritanism is. Instead of describing those who campaigned for the Biblical doctrine of free grace, the term is now used of those who would curb true Puritanism and replace it by denominational legalism and external orders and disciplines set up as equally saving doctrines. Indeed, the term was widely used in the 17 century to… Full Article

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Demythologising History

     One of several letters to the English Churchman concerning Laudianism in the Commonwealth church. Sir:      Ewan Wilson’s opinions of Britain’s 16-17th century Church and myself are misconceived. Neither exonerating nor mitigating Laud’s failings and guilt, I criticise Laudian intolerance openly wherever it occurs and protest when Wilson attempts to deny Presbyterianism’s greater Laudianism. Mr Wilson fails to see the ambiguity of his original statement concerning ‘evidence of Laud’s satisfactory views on Sovereign Grace and Arminianism’. The word ‘satisfactory’ was Wilson’s (now withdrawn) and could never be mine. If Wilson did his own homework instead of demanding repeatedly that I do his, he… Full Article

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Particular Redemption and the Free Offer

David H. J. Gay Brachus 2008 Obtainable from Amazon Books £10 per copy. Bulk prices available. No easy read      David Gay promises ‘no easy read’ in this supplement to his The Gospel Offer is Free: A Reply to George M. Ella’s The Free Offer and The Call of the Gospel. It is basically a collection of notes, quotes and sources in tiny print covering a hundred pages more than Gay’s initial work. ‘If this gets too involved’ Gay advises, “omit the copious footnotes”. But where is the main text to which they are all appended? It is scattered higgledy-piggledy throughout the notes. You might find half a sentence somewhere followed by eight pages of notes before two more sentences appear only to delve into… Full Article

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Review of Amyraut Affirmed

Review of Amyraut Affirmed: or ‘Owenism, a Caricature of Calvinism’ by Alan C. Clifford      In this provocative booklet, Dr Allan C. Clifford’s responds to Ian Hamilton’s Amyraldianism – is it modified Calvinism? by presenting Amyraldianism as orthodox Calvinism and the Westminster Confession as a caricature of it. Clifford’s argument is that both John Calvin (1509-1564) and Moses Amyraut (1596-1664) believed that God had two conflicting wills in salvation. Clifford is so enamoured with his theory that he dispenses with objective textual proof. He merely quotes speculations he has made in former works “for the benefit of those who have been either unable or unwilling to consult” them, arguing that this is all that… Full Article

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Contra Amyraldianism

Sir,      It is a swashbuckling challenge to turn my old frigate’s bows to Captain Clifford’s well-aimed broadside and I was as exhilarated by his action as I was frustrated by his strategy. Was this going to be my Sea of Trouble? I mused. I have pursued Captain Clifford for some years through Amyraldianism’s frothy waters, but have never engaged him until now. I still cannot follow his most evasive strategy in zig-zagging between the shallow Mere of Moïse and the deep Five Calvinian Coves, always expertly trimming his sails to suit the prevailing wind. I fear he could easily scupper me if I had not my Biblical compass and historical charts on board.      It would appear that the sprightly tar’s present strategy is… Full Article

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