Articles

John Brine (1703-1765), and his Contemporaries as Seen by Modern Revisionists Part II: Brine’s Theology

John Brine (1703-1765), and his Contemporaries as Seen by Modern Revisionists Part II: Brine’s Theology      In his Treatise on Various Subjects Brine says his calling is to defend the doctrines and principles of our religion, and to vindicate the sacred Word of God. As time is less than our subject craves, I shall select a few of his defences and vindications relevant to today’s debate and deal with justification, duty-faith, redemption, regeneration and sanctification. Justification      Biblical justification involves the full salvation of sinners, including election, union with Christ, adoption, forgiveness of sins, imputation, redemption, regeneration and sanctification. Today’s Pseudo- Reformed claim that… Full Article

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Thoughts on Church Government

     Debates on government and discipline have often caused controversy and dissent in church-life. Our present fragmented Church is largely due to disagreement over church order with the added quarrels over the ordinances and eschatology. Doctrines rarely come into these debates unless it is argued that church orders are savingly relevant. Rather controversy often arises from arbitrary principles of organisation and administration. The first efforts to split the Reformed Church in England centred around whether one should kneel, stand, sit or walk by in procession at the communion service, or whether the minister should pray before or after the sermon, or whether one regarded baptism as a symbolic pointer to God’s mercies in Christ… Full Article

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Maurice Roberts and the Free Offer Hoax

     The so-called Banner of Truth’s witch-hunt against alleged Hyper-Calvinists continues with Maurice Roberts quite deceptive apology for their new, radical theology hidden behind the mask of ‘The Free Offer of the Gospel’ (Issue 503-4). Pastor Roberts has picked out all the raisins and nuts he could find in the new BOT cake, seeking to lure traditional BOT readers away from the old paths by these tempting morsels. He has, however, offered us nothing of the seasoning of gall and bitter herbs which makes his cake the most stomach-turning culinary event since the counter-reformation opened their evil-smelling kitchen as purveyors of false food. A little of this comes through in Roberts’ accusing all those who disagree with him… Full Article

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The Relevance of the AV to Today’s Christian Life and Witness

The reasons for translating the Authorised Version      The English Bible of 1611 was called the Authorised Version because it was translated by the authority of both King and National Church. Objectors to the AV have challenged this truth but the facts speak for themselves. This was undertaken by three major teams of great scholars and churchmen who had worked on it interactively for over five years at England’s three major think- tanks at Westminster, Oxford and Cambridge. The translators’ aim was for accuracy and clarity conveyed in a high literary style. This new style was nevertheless thought by the godly scholars to be attainable by all English-speaking people through good teaching and preaching. It was a style highly… Full Article

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Francis Lambert and the Pan-European Reformation

Francis Lambert and the Pan-European Reformation        The Reformation in Europe around 1510-1530 was built on that of the preceding two centuries. In England Grosseteste, Bradwardine, Wycliffe and the Lollards had done great reforming work as also the Hussites, the Bohemian Brethren and the Waldensians on the Continent. There never was a century without Reformation somewhere in Europe and her influence on other countries. Such early reforms were prior to the denominational counter-Reformation which broke up the inter-Protestant and pan-European international revivals of true religion in those times. The break-up resulted in much Reformed knowledge being lost and inter-church renewal was forgotten where denominations replaced… Full Article

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The Development of Opposition to the Reformed Church of England

Part One: How things began   The gospel of transforming grace versus the gospel of unchanging law               There is much confusion concerning the alleged ‘puritanism’ of the 16th century non-Roman Catholic opposition to the Reformed Church of England and the Puritan Movement of the post-1640s and much has been written in recent years which has totally redefined, modified and radicalised what Puritanism is. Instead of describing those who campaigned for the Biblical doctrine of free grace, the term is now used of those who would curb true Puritanism and replace it by denominational legalism and external orders and disciplines set up as equally saving doctrines. Indeed, the term was widely used in the 17 century to… Full Article

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Substituting Fable for Historical Truth

Substituting Fable for Historical Truth        A marked negative feature of common-grace gospellers is the scorn which they pour on men of God who emphasise that the whole gospel must be preached to the whole man as the Spirit leads. Thus they condemn such Christians of the past as Tobias Crisp, John Ryland Senior, William Romaine, William Huntington, John Gill, Augustus Toplady and Robert Hawker who would not dilute their gospel to suit what the common-grace gospellers call ‘man’s agency’. These men were called to preach Christ’s victorious crucifixion accomplishments, including great Bible truths such as the eternal union of Christ with His Bride; Christ’s faith and righteousness imputed to His people, election,… Full Article

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Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part Three: Melanchthon’s Failure as a Reformer

Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part One: Melanchthon’s Climb to Fame Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany Part Three: Melanchthon’s Failure as a Reformer ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Part Three: Melanchthon’s Failure as a Reformer The bigamy scandal      There is no doubt that Melanchthon’s with Luther in the scandal of Phil Philip, who maintained that it was impossible for him to remain faithful to one wife, had been encouraged by Pope Clement VII to find another. As he became more and more Reformed, he turned to Luther and Melanchthon for advice as the self-proclaimed heads of the Church. Luther thus granted Philip a dispensation in ‘his’ Church to marry a second wife on the basis… Full Article

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Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany

Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part One: Melanchthon’s Climb to Fame Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany Part Three: Melanchthon’s Failure as a Reformer ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany Rifts that did not break friendship      Now Rome sent one agent after another, including Frederick Nausea, Cardinal Campeggio’s personal secretary to win Melanchthon for themselves. He told all these emissaries of Rome that if they had the Church’s welfare at heart, they would join him in purifying it from faulty doctrines and traditions. He told Nausea that he erred if he thought Luther wanted to abolish church practices. The fight is not about external things… Full Article

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Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part One: Melanchthon’s Climb to Fame

Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560): The Creator of Lutheranism Part One: Melanchthon’s Climb to Fame Part Two: Melanchthon the Preceptor of Germany Part Three: Melanchthon’s Failure as a Reformer ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Part One: Melanchthon’s Climb to Fame ‘Big Names’ are often deceptive      When studying the ‘Big Names’ of the Reformation in depth, one is led to suspect that such ‘Names’ are merely pronounced ‘Big’ because they have been highly illuminated by church historians with specific interests though equally ‘big’ men and women of God have been left unobserved. This is certainly the case with Philip Melanchthon, Heinrich Bullinger and Theodore Beza who have long been seen as mere successors and… Full Article

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