Articles

John Gill and the Charge of Hyper-Calvinism

     One of the most successful Baptist contenders for the truth in the 18th century was John Gill  (1697-1771) , a London pastor who was second to none in the kingdom for scholarly learning and prowess as a preacher. Sadly Gill has faded from the reading of most evangelicals, owing to the fact that his successors held to a radically different view of the gospel. Now he is being rediscovered as the number of publications dealing with him over the last few years show . Something, however, is going seriously wrong. Though contemporary American works such as Thomas J. Nettle’s By His Grace and for His Glory and Timothy George’s essay on Gill in Baptist Theologians show clearly that Gill was no Hyper-Calvinist but a great Reformed 18th… Full Article

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Henry Bullinger (1504-1575)

Shepherd of the Churches Bullinger’s importance for the English Reformation      Perhaps no Reformer has been so neglected in modern times as Henry Bullinger, though he produced far more sound Christian writings than Luther, Calvin and Zwingli combined. An average of four editions of his works per year were printed in Switzerland alone for a hundred years and over fifty printers in other European countries were turning out countless editions. Reformers such as Miles Coverdale translated Bullinger into English from the 1530s on. Bullinger’s books were internationally treasured because they were said to be free of Calvin’s obscurity and Musculus’ scholastical subtlety and packed much sound, perspicuous doctrine into… Full Article

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